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Hailing from Italy and currently based between there and Reykjavík, Iceland, three-piece My Cruel Goro present their debut eponymous EP, featuring 3 tracks chalked full of early 70s energetic Brit rock with punk leanings, yet through the prism of a thick modern soundbed. Tomatrax caught up with the band to talk about their music.

Where did the name My Cruel Goro come from?

Andrea Maraschi: It’s my pet’s name. He’s a cat, a Maine coon: he’s huge. I named him Goro as the protagonist in a famous Italian movie, “Fantozzi alla riscossa”. But then he proved so cruelly adorable that I had to name him My Cruel Goro. And, you know, it also seemed quite an interesting name for a band. Then me and my friends formed a band, so that we could have a band with such a great name.

Andrea Marcellini: …that’s complete bollocks! Ahahaha.

Tommaso Adanti: have you been drinking man?! Anyway, we’ll never tell you the truth (evil laugh)!!!

You’ve just released your debut EP, what’s it like to have it out?

Andrea Marcellini: Well… it’s fine. We’ve been getting good exposure and approving feedbacks. That’s pretty cool, yes. Huge thanks to our PR Shauna.

What made you decide to make the EP self titled?

Andrea Maraschi: Basically the same process which had led us to use this name for the band. My pet has a really amazing name!

Andrea Marcellini: I repeat myself… that’s complete bollocks! Ahhahah.

Tommaso Adanti: He’s been drinking… definitely!

What was the inspiration for the front cover?

Tommaso Adanti: Don’t know really! Our friend Massimo Scoposky did the artwork. We really dig it, but no clues on what it’s all about. Great stuff though!


My Cruel Goro arose from the ashes of your previous project, will any of the material written under your previous project be released under My Cruel Goro?

Andrea Maraschi: Yes, sometimes we take old songs and see if they still sound good, or better or worse. Personally, though, I prefer writing new stuff, it’s more stimulating for the whole band I guess.

Given your from Italy, why do you write your songs in English?

Andrea Marcellini: don’t know… I guess it comes down to our musical attitude. I mean, since I was a child I’ve always listened to a whack of international artists. And I guess that largely influenced my musical sensitivity. I remember when I wrote my very first song (I was around 14 or so) and… well, I just wrote down the lyrics in English, without even thinking about the language thing. It’s something really natural.

You are based in Italy and Iceland, how does playing in Italy compare with Iceland?

Andrea Maraschi: Honestly we don’t know yet, ‘cause we’re gonna start to play in Iceland only in the next months. But we already know it’s gonna be a great experience. Playing in Italy nowadays sucks. It literally does. The Italian music scene (I don’t even know if there’s one) consists of DJs and bands coming out from talent shows. Not the best place to play, even if your band’s name is awesome… ahahhah.

Is it hard to be based across two countries?

Tommaso Adanti: Indeed. We have far shorter time to work on our projects, to rehearse and to record in the studio. It’s bloody hard, but this makes us more tenacious, maybe. And more energetic, for when you have just a little time to express yourself, you scream louder.

What was the inspiration behind the video for ‘Crapford’?

Andrea Marcellini: ‘Crapford’ is about living within the post-urban oblivion and the decay of it all. It’s about people losing their emotional landmarks. Then imagine a fictional tube where the last stop is ‘Crapford’. People just get off the train and have the chance to enter a both magical ad terrifying dimension. Anything is allowed, you can loosen up and free your mind by doing whatever you want, but at your very own risk. This is ‘Crapford’.
Many thanks again to our friend Massimo Scoposky for directing and filming the video. Amazing stuff as always!

Do you ever listen to your own music?

Andrea Maraschi: Occasionally, yes. You realize if your songs are good or not only after some months after recording them, so…it’s always a good test.

Andrea Marcellini: for sure. I’m obsessed with my own music. In a negative way, of course. I get extremely anxious every time I listen to some stuff of my own for I’m afraid that I might suddenly think it’s absolute crap! This is called paranoia, I know…

Tommaso Adanti: Anytime. And it’s such good music!

What other music do you listen to?

Andrea Maraschi: Nothing in particular, at the moment. Nothing inspires me. And, what is more, Richard Ashcroft was to release is next solo album last year, but we’re all still waiting. Come on, lad!

Tommaso Adanti: hmmm… if I have to cite modern bands I’d say The Hives and Arctic Monkeys. But you know… I do prefer less recent artists.

Andrea Marcellini: don’t forget that Tommy was a headbanger not so long ago. Where is your Slayer t-shirt Tommy?! Anyway, I’ve been listening to Nick Drake, At the Drive-In, “Is This It” by The Strokes and Slaves lately. I’m also really into Ummagma. Amazing band as well as roster-mates. Highly recommended! Ultimately, a friend of mine has been trying to get me into Wolf Alice, but… still don’t know whether it’s my thing or not. Hope to work it out sooner or later ahahah.

Now that your EP is out, what do you plan on doing next?

Tommaso Adanti: We have already recorded some new tracks. So… we’re likely to drop a new release in the near future. And we’re actually planning to tour a bit during the winter.

Check out My Cruel Goro’s facebook page to find out more!

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